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Houses by Street – The Boulevard

The Boulevard, Cheltenham

The subdivision that formed this street comprised land once forming part of Chorley’s Mount Pleasant. 

The street trees are listed on the Hornsby Shire Council Heritage Register which comprises Schedule 5 (Environmental Heritage) of the Hornsby Local Environment Plan 2013.

Part of this street has the tennis courts, and croquet lawns and bowling rinks of the Cheltenham Recreation Club on the south east end of it. Tennis was not however restricted to the Recreation Club with newer houses now occupying houses 3, 5, 6, 18, 11 and 22: which were all once occupied by private tennis courts for a contiguous house. 

Southern (or odd numbered) side

  1. The trees are listed on the Hornsby Shire Council Heritage Register which comprises Schedule 5 (Environmental Heritage) of the Hornsby Local Environment Plan 2013.

5, Jenanbee, was built in 1915 to 17 for Thomas Bailey Nossiter. The house name comes from a combination of each of the names of the Nossiter daughters – Jean, Nancy and Beatrice. Thomas was manager of the Peacock Jam Factory and he went on to be a director of the iconic Australian company Henry Jones IXL after that company took over Peacock. Thomas was also the President of Pennant Hills Golf Club (1923-1932) and appointed a Life Member of the Club in 1944. His wife, Nell, worked on numerous local charities. 

The house was designed by local architect William Nixon. It is a large brick house with the upper walls stuccoed, tall and slender chimneys that are also stuccoed and having square brick pots. Ventilation slats are in the side and front gables. The house was sited on the south west corner to maximise space for the garden and tennis court. It also had a horse paddock and stable, a poultry yard and dove cote.   

Between 1990 and 2007 G Mills was a member of the Civic Trust and gave this as his residential address. 

The house and garden are listed on the Hornsby Shire Council Heritage Register which comprises Schedule 5 (Environmental Heritage) of the Hornsby Local Environment Plan 2013.

7 was built circa 1925 and has had a number of additions. The first Cheltenham kindergarten was conducted in the then garage. 

11 Rosman (and at one time Morngton, The Gables), was built in 1914 for Ernest and Rosabelle Trigg. The name reflects Mrs Triggs name ‘Rose’ combined with ‘mount’ for the rise where the house is sited. Ernest was General Manager of the Meadowbank Manufacturing Company. Their only child died before they moved into this house and they only lived here for some 8 years. They were active Anglicans and attended St Andrews Cathedral where Ernest was a lay canon.

William Nixon was the architect and the house is designed in the arts and crafts style. It has many gables, ends covered in timber shingles, tall chimneys and wide eaves. A number of the windows are of diamond panes with a single ribbon and red and green roses in the upper portion. On the eastern side of the house was the tennis court reached by stone steps. There was a large garden. 

The home was sold in 1920 to Charles Potts a grain and produce merchant. Then in 1926 to W Kenrick and in 1928 to Mrs C M Pollock.

The house is listed on the Hornsby Shire Council Heritage Register which comprises Schedule 5 (Environmental Heritage) of the Hornsby Local Environment Plan 2013.

15 Boambee, was built 1914 to 1916 [1] for Clarence Hardie Gorman of Hardie & Gorman real estate agents who acted on the sale of a number of subdivisions in these suburbs.  In about 1919 the home was sold to Mr & Mrs Thomas Irons the parents of Mrs (Nell) Nossiter of Jeranbee. This was a deliberate choice as the Irons wished to be nearer their daughter after two sons (Ralph and David) had died in 1916 during World War 1. When Thomas irons died, his widow sold this house and commenced to live with her daughter. In 1920 David Bertram was living here then he moved across the street and this home was purchased by Major T G Millner whose commitment to rugby led to the oval in Eastwood being named in his honour. 

The house is listed on the Hornsby Shire Council Heritage Register which comprises Schedule 5 (Environmental Heritage) of the Hornsby Local Environment Plan 2013.

[1] For a contrary view that the house was built in 1910 see Northern District Times, Property Supplement, 4 September 2013. 

Northern (or even numbered) side

2 was built around the 1920s and is a version of the bungalow style. Note the bulky columns on brick bases and small paned windows. 

4 is a cream bricked home of the 1940s to 1950s. Between 1991 and 2004, at least, Diane Boyages was a member of the Civic Trust and gave this as her residential address. 

6, Chepstowe, was built as the second home for Henry ‘Harry’ Chorley. It was then owned by the Perdriau family. Extensive alterations were made in the 1950s and again more recently so that very few original features can still be seen.  

10 – 12 is a rambling bungalow style home with small leadlight front windows. Of particular note is the garden with palms, old spruce with glaucous foliage giving a park like setting that is complemented by a gravel driveway. This is in keeping with the era of the house. 

The garden is listed on the Hornsby Shire Council Heritage Register which comprises Schedule 5 (Environmental Heritage) of the Hornsby Local Environment Plan 2013.

14 Tatworth, was built for John Lyon in about 1912. Again, note the ventilator louvres in the front gable. Note the stone gate posts and the clipped hedge. Each of the neighbouring houses also previously had hedges.  

Between 1995 and 2003 M Thompson was a member of the Civic Trust. 

The house and garden are listed on the Hornsby Shire Council Heritage Register which comprises Schedule 5 (Environmental Heritage) of the Hornsby Local Environment Plan 2013.

18 dates from circa 1910 possibly for W B Bull. It is a good example of the federation style with a country feel – by showing more timber than would be expected in a city setting. There are patterned leadlights on the front door, dormer windows and, as elsewhere, ventilator windows. 

W Figtree was a member of the Civic Trust between at least 1990 and 2006. 

The house and garden are listed on the Hornsby Shire Council Heritage Register which comprises Schedule 5 (Environmental Heritage) of the Hornsby Local Environment Plan 2013.

20 This house was built in 1968 on the neighbour’s tennis court by Dr Peter Pickering, and ophthalmogist and his wife Joan. This family sold it in 2018 [1]. Dr Pickering was a member of the Civic Trust between at least 1970 and 2008.

[1] Northern District Times, 14 November 2018. 

22 dates from circa 1906 and has painted rendered walls. While originally single storey, it had a second storey added in about 2010. Note the large timber brackets on the verandah. The driveway is brick. It has a simple, rural air. The large unbroken roof line and overhang is characteristic of the bungalow style. 

24 was built in 1914 in the bungalow style with a slate roof featuring an uplift at each end and is white painted brick. It has an unusual window treatment and solid timber verandah posts on brick. It has two gables offset to each other – one over the main house and the other over what was a projecting room. Note the tecoma hedge which originally was common to this street – and elsewhere in the suburb. The garden was re-designed in the 1970s with trees and shrubs replacing lawn, to give a greater sense of seclusion. The home was bought in 1930 by Lorna Arnott, who was formerly living nearby. It was then sold in 1939 to the family who still reside in it. 

Between 1988 and 2008 at least, Carolyn Watt was an active member of the Civic Trust including, at one stage, its President. 

The house is listed on the Hornsby Shire Council Heritage Register which comprises Schedule 5 (Environmental Heritage) of the Hornsby Local Environment Plan 2013.

26, Glenview, is an excellent example of a Californian bungalow built in 1913 for Keith & Lorna Arnott of the biscuit family. Keith was the son of Herbert Arnott who lived in Brunoy on Beecroft Road but unfortunately he died at only 29 years of pneumonia following an attack of influenza. While a student at The Kings School he had been active in sport. He left a widow and three young boys.  Harold A Sindel was living here in 1915. It has an unusual patterned slate roof and sunray motif on the front gable. It has a period formal front garden. 

26 The house is listed on the Hornsby Shire Council Heritage Register which comprises Schedule 5 (Environmental Heritage) of the Hornsby Local Environment Plan 2013.

28, Verona.  It was built in 1913 for Frank Sindel. It has a slate roof, white painted brick, bull’s eye window with coloured glass. The Sindel family were still there in at least 1923. 

The house is listed on the Hornsby Shire Council Heritage Register.